worship times

Sundays at 9:30am & 11:00am in the Worship Center

Learn a little more
what to expect

At a weekend service, you can expect:

  • Each service to last about an hour.
  • Engaging messages based on the Bible.
  • High-energy worship music.
  • Comfortable, casual attire.
for your kids

Each weekend, we teach the truth about who God is and who they are because of Him.

Preschool Children
worship times

Sundays at 9:30am & 11:00am in the Worship Center

Learn a little more
what to expect

At a weekend service, you can expect:

  • Each service to last about an hour.
  • Engaging messages based on the Bible.
  • High-energy worship music.
  • Comfortable, casual attire.
for your kids

Each weekend, we teach the truth about who God is and who they are because of Him.

Preschool Children
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Stories of Hope

“'For I know the plans I have for you,' declares the Lord, 'plans to prosper you and not to harm you, plans to give you hope and a future.'”

Jeremiah 29:11

Our Story

A mere 23 years after Texas joined the United States of America, something was planted in the heart of its Hill Country. A new hope was planted. A new hope that survived pioneer violence, civil war, economic crisis during Reconstruction, world wars, the Great Depression and hostile social reform, and has been a strong force for good in the Cedar Park, Texas area for 147 years (and still counting).

New Hope's story begins with a handful of determined and courageous pioneers. At a time when the Governor of Texas, Sam Houston, advised settlers to pull back from the frontier, and many farmers left their homes, this group of men and women put their trust in God, and stayed.

 

Hard Knock Life

These men and women faced harsh life. Williamson County at that time was primarily an agriculture community, which required favorable weather conditions for crops and livestock to survive. As Reconstruction from the U.S. Civil War continued, the value of farms dropped, and there was a rise in crime (horse and cattle thieves), long-term family feuds, and drunken brawls which sometimes led to homicides.

In the middle of difficult life conditions, a small group of men and women had hope. They believed there was a purpose and life greater than the value of life they witnessed. They believed God had plans for not only them and their families, but for their community.

 

Humble Beginnings

Some evidence suggests worship services may have been conducted as early as 1847, but it was not until this small group of men and women met in the home of James M. & Elizabeth Trammel on October 22, 1868, that the New Hope Baptist Church of Christ was recognized as an official church.

The men and women who constituted the first New Hope in 1868 included:

  • James M. Trammel
  • Elizabeth Trammel
  • Jesse R. Hicks
  • W. S. Hicks
  • S.I Taylor
  • Isaac D. Barefoot
  • Thomas H. Bacon
  • William Steel
  • J. Enochs

The hearts and attitudes of these founders can be seen in their original church covenant, penned by Isaac D. Barefoot at that 1868 meeting.

"We engage, therefore, by the aid of the Holy Spirit to walk together in Christian love; to strive for the advancement of this church, in knowledge, holiness, and comfort; to promote its prosperity and spirituality; to sustain its worship, ordinances, discipline, and doctrines; to contribute cheerfully and regularly to the support of the ministry, the expenses of the church, the relief of the poor, and the spread of the gospel through all nations...
We further engage to watch over one another in brotherly love; to remember one another in prayer; to aid one another in sickness and distress; to cultivate Christian sympathy in feeling and Christian courtesy in speech; to be slow to take offense, but always ready for reconciliation and mindful of the rules of our Saviour to secure it without delay." 
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EARLY GROWTH

Thomas H. Bacon was the first elected pastor of New Hope. Members met for worship services in each others homes, located in the Block House Creek community. Immediately, New Hope began to grow.

"after being regulary organized into a church we call the name of new hope after which the door of the church was opened for the reception of members and received brother S. Baker by letter also brother J.T. Long and sister Missouri Trammel presented themselves and related their experience of grace and was received by the church for baptism." 1868 Church Minutes

Two years later, in 1870, the church built a log church in this same area on the Trammel property. The following year, in 1871, the church building was leased by the State of Texas for use as a schoolhouse.

New Hope built a new frame church in 1879, located one mile southeast of its original location. New Hope has been located at this site ever since. The old log church and land were sold to the state of Texas for $30.

We know from records that life didn't necessarily become easier. Families of New Hope suffered loss of children, as well as other livelihood difficulties. But these families felt the support, accountability, help and encouragement of their brothers and sisters in Christ. They even found time to relax and bond as a church family through church picnics. 

 

STILL GOING

Although New Hope's story and history goes on, we recognize that our story began with this small group of men and women who trusted in God, and responded to His calling of this church body to serve one another and the Williamson County/Cedar Park communities. We are thankful for the new hope God planted in their hearts and in this community.

 

Sources: 1868 New Hope Church Minutes, Cedar Park Heritage Society (online: www.cedarparkhistory.com/timeline), Texas State Historical Association (online: tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/hda03 and tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/hcw11),
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Sharing our stories and how God has brought us through difficult times offers great encouragement to others!

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